Categories
Art Pen and ink sketches

Boats in Blokzijl drawing

This is a scene from one of the side canals in Blokzijl.

blokzijl boats sm
Pen and ink, 24 x 32 cm, 9/5 x 12.5″
Categories
Art Pen and ink sketches

Arnhem Gate, pen and ink

arnhem gate sm
Pen and ink, 24 x 32 cm, 9/5 x 12.5″

This gorgeous gate is called Sabelspoort. It is only one of the four medieval city gates that remain.

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Art blog Blog 2020 Pen and ink sketches

The Cathedral in Münster

munster cathedral
Cathedral in Münster, pen and ink

The current Cathedral in Münster dates from 1265. The first church on the site was built in the 9th century and a second in the 10th or 11th, demolished to build the current structure.

It was badly damaged in WWII. It was not restored to its state before the war. The rose window has been vastly simplified, for instance.

Categories
Art Pen and ink sketches

Steeple in Brandenburg, pen and ink

blokzijl boats sm
pen and ink, 24 x 32 cm, 9/5 x 12.5″

We passed through this lovely medieval town, mooring in town while we explored the area. It is my favorite German town!

Categories
Art Pen and ink sketches People and portraits

Torrents: Book cover ideas

I recently was asked to do a book cover for a small publisher by the author who is a fan of my Music series of pen and ink drawings. These drawings are done at the Palau de la Musica in Valencia while in the audience. The lights are dimmed and typically we sit in the balcony where the sound is best. It is a fair distance from the musicians. So between the low light and the distance, I can not see the drawing I am making and the musicians are a bit on the fuzzy side, the faces and hand in particular being particularly small. Thus the results, which I do not see until the lights come up, are unpredictable and totally spontaneous. These are circumstances that are hard if not impossible to duplicate without renting the auditorium. In addition the author had a particular figure in mind and probably would not want half of him to be represented by a blind swipe with my water brush and be missing other body parts and the gesture altogether. So I had to mimic my own art under normal lighting and distance circumstances yet maintain major aspects of the figure in the photo she sent. It was a challenge, frustrating at times, but in the end she got a drawing she liked and thought would work well for her.

Here are my first versions, which is similar to the final one but which has far more detail in the background than the latter, which only has 3 shafts of light. I did not realize how stark she wanted it to be. It gives the figure so little context. But it was what she had in wind.

christian book cover 1
This figure is a bit fatter than the author wanted
christian book cover 3
I like the face on this one a bit better, about as much as the one on the final.

Both of these drawings are available for purchase.  

Categories
Art Pen and ink sketches

Sketches from England

We stayed at a friend’s house in this small town in England near Cambridge, where they filmed episodes of Inspector Morse, a popular British detective show from the 1980’s or 90’s. It was a farm house converted to a residence, with much charm. It was heated by the huge kitchen stove with water circulating to both floors. Outside a fox would visit, looking for a meal of old cat whom we were there to care for. Our friends were off for a long trip to southeast Asia, gone for the month. We had use of their car, which we used to get to the train for the trip into London, which allowed us to see a few plays and see the museums again.

view from window in the Heath

old farm house pen ink watercolor
House in Flackwell Heath, water color and ink
old farm house left side flackwell
House in Flackwell Heath, ink
egyptian two figures
At the British Museum, watercolor and ink
egyptian woman dance
Woman Dances, based on Egyptian statue at British Museum
Categories
Art Pen and ink sketches

Steam Locomotive, pen and ink drawing 

 

 

 

Between Hoorn and Medemblik you can travel by steam locomotive. 
 

Steam Locomotive Hoorn to Medemblik. 105 years old. Pen and ink 15 x 17 cm, 6″ x 8″

[wpecpp name=”Locomotive” price=”150″ align=”left”]
 
The volunteers have painstakingly restored the engine and cars.  We enjoyed the company of a tall blond (there are many here) and her two girls, here depicted with the volunteer attendant in very well made traditional costume.  
Categories
Art Pen and ink sketches People and portraits

Girls on a Dock

Girls on a Dock

Girls on a Dock
Girls on a Dock, pen and ink, 4″ x 6″

Purchase original:  

 

[wpecpp name=”Girls on a Dock, original” price=”150″ align=”left”]

 

$60 Giclee print (highest quality available), signed 1 of 100  

 

[wpecpp name=”Girls on a Dock, unlimited edition” price=”35″ align=”left”]

 

Unlimited edition $35 12″ x 16″/ 30 cm x 40 cm high quality paper, printed signature 

 

[wpecpp name=”Girls on a Dock, unlimited edition” price=”35″ align=”left”]

Categories
Art blog blog 2017 Blog 2018 Paris drawings Pen and ink sketches People and portraits

Loving Vincent – Pictures of his life

“Loving Vincent” is a flick about Vincent Van Gogh made entirely of paintings done in his thick paint, swirly, expressive style.  There are 65,000 paintings in all, each done on glass plates.  The plates were first placed before the filmed of the costumed cast members, reducing drawing time dramatically, and making it possible to make this movie with just 125 and not, say, the 10,000 artists it would have taken to cover an area the size of London or Manhattan if each plate were laid out in the original size.  All this adds up to an unusual experience and a total immersion in the visual world of the artist.  But there’s more.

The film could have suffered significantly from the flaw that plagues musicals, whose stories often serve as an excuse for the next number.  Loving Vincent’s story line, however, is not so thin.  Its basis is writing that challenges the initial contention that Van Gogh committed suicide. 

The movie opens with the postman possessing a returned letter addressed to Vincent’s brother Theo.  He recruits his son Armand to hand deliver the letter.  Armand soon finds that Theo is dead, so he looks for an alternative.  The film is a series of interviews of the people who knew Vincent, all portrait subjects, interviews that further what turns into an investigation of the death of the artist.  As things unfold we are provided a picture of the life of Vincent as well as his death, some interviewees corroborating the suicide theory, while others leave us doubting that verdict.

Several issues emerge that lead us to question the suicide conclusion.  Having pulled that trigger you would have left black powder marks on your clothes and hands, and the accounts show conflicts in that regard.  Also we are told of the persistent ridicule and bullying by town youths, any one of which could have had motive, perhaps even the one who later confessed to mistreating Vincent in his youth.  Then there is Vincent’s state of mind.  “Loving Vincent” is what Van Gogh wrote in each of his letters to his brother Theo, with whom he had a close relationship.  Thus Vincent was not entirely alone and unloved by family, and he was close to some of the interviewees as well.  

There are several other observations of interest.  First, Vincent wrote, “I want to touch people with my art.  I want them to say:  he feels deeply, he feels tenderly.”   Are those the sentiments of someone who would end his own life?  Perhaps but perhaps not.  Second, Vincent’s lack of commercial success could certainly contribute to his perception of self-worth.  However Monet, the most famous of painters,  had recently highly praised Vincent’s art, and Vincent sold a painting, his first.  Third there is the odd location and angle of the lethal wound.  People who attempt suicide with a gun usually go for the head not the stomach.  None of these observations are conclusive of course, but there is certainly enough to cloud the official verdict, and to give substance to what would otherwise be an art slide show with an excuse for a story.

The colored images flicker in a way that other animations I have seen do not, adding an element of visual intrigue to that surrounding conflicting images of Vincent’s life and death.  They also add an element of brain fatigue.  Fortunately the flash backs in black and white give much-needed rest for the eyes. 

This is a unique film about a unique man making unique art.  Check it out – and stay through the credits.  You’ll be treated to Lianne La Havas’s deep toned charming rendition of Starry Starry Night.  

Rotten Tomatoes reviews      Robert Kodger review  Tim Brayton review  Vanity Fair: The Van Gogh Mystery

__________________

A friend and I went to Auvers-sur-Oise, which is not too far from Paris.  It is here that Vincent Van Gogh lived his last months.  While he lived in this town Van Gogh did a painting of the church,  now one of his more famous paintings among the 800 he squeezed into his short life.   Here is my rendition, in memory of this man who contributed so much to art and who received so little in return. 

 

Church at Avers sur Oise: Ode to Vincent, waatercolor, 11.5 x 16.5", 30 x 42 cm
Church at Avers sur Oise: Ode to Vincent, watercolor, 11.5 x 16.5″, 30 x 42 cm, $450

Church at Avers sur Oise, graphite

Church at Avers sur Oise
Church at Avers Sur Oise, water color

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The first of the following drawings I did at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, which displayed a photo of a young Van Gogh.  This and other early photos are a stark contrast to the gaunt and haunted look of Vincent’s later self portraits, which are widely seen.  Here is a more rare glimpse of the man.  

Van Gogh As Young Man, pencil
Van Gogh As Young Man, pencil

 

Van Gogh As Young Man, pen and ink
Van Gogh As Young Man, pen and ink

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Portrait of Peasant, after the Van Gogh, pen and ink
Portrait of Peasant, after the Van Gogh, pen and ink

 

 

In case you need a touching moment, here’s Lianne’s rendition of Starry Starry Night.  Don Mclean gave light to this song that will live as one of the most touching eulogies of all time, whose disturbed mind gave us so much beauty, so much innovation.